All reagents must be handled and disposed

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The extraction procedure may not kill bacteria; therefore the extract must be handled with the same precautions. Dispose of all specimens, inoculated products and equipment used in this test as biohazardous material. Disinfect any spills according to biohazard protocols. 10. Extraction Reagents 1 and 2 contain a slightly basic and a weak acid solution. •Only the smallest quantities •Stored in their original containers •Keep away from food & samples to be analysed •Chemicals past their expiry date must be disposed of •Maintain an up-to-date inventory of all purchased reagents and chemicals p. 30 8 –WORKING WITH FLAMMABLE SOLVENTS p. 31 Remove all reagents and supplies from the Biosafety Cabinet upon completion of the experiment, or if there is a long delay in time between experimental steps. 6. Users MUST follow all safety and cleanliness guidelines: a. Label all reagents and samples stored in common areas (not-labeled samples will be thrown away during weekly lab clean-up) b. Many industrial processes use a hydrofluoric acid (HF) catalyst in their manufacturing process. Part of this acid must be neutralized with a base chemical, often potassium hydroxide (KOH). Typically, the resulting material, potassium fluoride (KF), must be classified, handled and disposed as waste.  These reagents can be handled safely in the laboratory, if proper syringe techniques are used. The reagent can be dispensed using a syringe or double-tipped needle (16, 18 or 20 gauge) inserted through the hole in the metal cap, as shown in the figure below. A Schlenk line in a fume hood with inert gas flow will be necessary. Organolithium reagents should be used in a glove box filled with inert gas, or in a certified fume hood using proper air-free techniques maintaining the pyrophoric solution under a blanket of inert gas. Organolithium reagents MUST be kept under inert atmosphere (e.g. nitrogen, argon) at all times. Highly reactive reagents used in chemical reactions. Mixtures of chemicals, such as reaction mixtures, containing highly reactive reagents must be carefully and completely quenched as part of your experimental procedure before they are collected for waste disposal. Disposal of wastes—2,3,7,8-TCDD decomposes above 800°C. Low-level waste such as absorbent paper, tissues, animal remains, and plastic gloves may be burned in a good incinerator. Gross quantities (milligrams) should be packaged securely and disposed through commercial or governmental channels which are capable of handling the air for brief periods of time, but the containers must be flushed with inert gas before storage. Transferring and Weighing Pyrophoric Solid Reagents • Gather all necessary experimental equipment first to avoid prolonged exposure of pyrophoric solids to air. 1. Lab coats must be worn and fastened until all experiments have been completed and they must be taken off outside the laboratory. 2.Gloves must be worn when doing experiments and they must be removed and properly disposed after experiments. Pyrophorics must be handled under inert atmospheres and in such a way that rigorously excludes air/moisture since they ignite on contact with air and/or water. They all tend to be toxic and many come dissolved in a flammable solvent. The requirements of the RCRA apply to all the companies that generate hazardous waste as well as those companies that store or dispose hazardous waste in the United States. Many types of businesses generate hazardous waste. dry cleaners, automobile repair shops, hospitals, exterminators, and photo processing centers may all generate hazardous ... Caulking containing concentrations of PCBs equal to or greater than 50 ppm shall be handled and disposed of as hazardous waste. Lamp Ballasts. All ballasts (PCB and non PCB) must be collected for disposal, containers for ballast disposal can be obtained by contacting EHS Hazardous Materials Management. require the use of accessory reagents, which must be added directly to the sample. Disposal of all chemical materials is subject to governmental regulation. All tests will produce potentially dangerous sharp and pointed glass. These sharp objects must be handled and disposed of carefully. The dissolved oxygen test employs the indigo carmine method. Waste must be disposed of in accordance with federal, state and local environmental control regulations. All blood components and biological materials should be handled as potentially hazardous. Decontaminate and dispose specimens and all potentially contaminated materials as they could contain infectious agents. The tops must be removed from all bottles put out for disposal and there should be no detectable smell of chemials from any bottle put for disposal. Waste for special disposal This is a troublesome and expensive method of disposal and the quantity of special waste must be kept to an absolute minimum. Upon disposal, flush with large volumes of water to prevent metal azide build-up in plumbing (3). 4. Primary Antibody, Negative Control Reagent, Linker, and Visualization Reagent contain material of animal origin. 5. Specimens, before and after fixation, and all materials exposed to them, should be handled as if capable of transmitting infection,  These reagents can be handled safely in the laboratory, if proper syringe techniques are used. The reagent can be dispensed using a syringe or double-tipped needle (16, 18 or 20 gauge) inserted through the hole in the metal cap, as shown in the figure below. A Schlenk line in a fume hood with inert gas flow will be necessary. 10. Reagents and buffer over-spill should be blotted dry on completion of the manipulation. 11. Do not allow the wells to completely dry during an assay. 12. Disposal or decontamination of fluid in the waste reservoir from either the plate washer or trap for vacuum line in the manual system should be in accordance with • All samples, biological reagents and disposable materials used in the assay must be considered as potentially able to transmit infectious agents. They should therefore be disposed of in accordance with the prevailing regulations and guidelines of the agencies holding jurisdiction over the laboratory and the regulations of eachCountry. Reagent Preparation Version 3.0 Pub. No. J32851_EN 3 Reagent Preparation The gel card is provided ready to use. Each card contains monoclonal antibody, monoclonal control, and buffered gel for one forward and reverse ABO and D antigen grouping. The gel card is heat-sealed with aluminum foil to preserve the integrity of the reagents. 5) Specimens, before and after fixation, and all materials exposed to them, should be handled as if capable of transmitting infection, and disposed of with proper precautions (8). 6) Incubation times or methods other than those specified may give erroneous results. 7) Reagents have been optimally diluted. 1. Lab coats must be worn and fastened until all experiments have been completed and they must be taken off outside the laboratory. 2.Gloves must be worn when doing experiments and they must be removed and properly disposed after experiments. Discard the vial and use a new one.  Waste should be disposed of in accordance with applicable local regulations.  Use only the reagents from the same batch of kits. The reagent strips must be handled and stored properly in order to ensure that results are accurate. The following precautions should be observed: Store strips according to the manufacturer's recommendation. DO NOT expose strips to moisture, volatile fumes, or direct sunlight (emphasized in the image on the right). Hazardous Chemicals or Waste Ashop using hazardous chemicals (solvents, paints, etc.) must comply with the OSHA Right-to-Know standard. Safety data sheets (SDS) for all of the chemicals or product in the shop must be available to all users, and an annual chemical inventory must be submitted to EH&S. Waste must be handled in accordance with ... 14. Dispose of all chemical waste properly. Never mix chemicals in sink drains. Sinks are to be used only for water and those solutions designated by the instructor. Solid chemicals, metals, matches, filter paper, and all other insoluble materials are to be disposed of in the proper waste containers, not in the sink. Storage instructions -All reagents must be stored away from light at -20 °C and, if unopened, can be used until the expiration date printed on the label. After the expiration date, the quality guarantee is no longer valid. -All reagents should be carefully thawed prior to use (e.g., in a refrigerator at 2 °C - 8 °C). All chemical product containers should be emptied to the extent practical. Any residue remaining in the containers may result in the generation of hazardous waste that must be properly handled and disposed of. Re-use of improperly handled "empty" containers, could result in health and/or safety concerns. Jan 01, 2011 · Such (nearly empty) containers must be rinsed with an inert solvent and neutralized, with adequate cooling, prior to disposal (see NEUTRALIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF PYROPHORIC LIQUIDS AND SOLIDS below). Products from pyrophoric reagents should be handled as potentially highly reactive materials. during handling, storage, and disposal. In general, pyrophoric reagents are usually handled in a glovebox or Schlenk line under an inert gas. Some pyrophoric solids, such as lithium and sodium, are sold as dispersions in mineral oil to reduce the rate of oxidation to oxides/hydroxides and the pyrophoric character of the reagents.